• "Students become mathematically fluent thinkers when they have many occasions to make sense of problems and apply their understandings toward increasingly sophisticated problems." (Matney, 2014, p. 34).

Overview

This is the EDU 312 course home page and it is divided into 3 sections. On this wikipage, you will find: 1.) course information; 2.) the weekly calendar which consists of the topics of the course, links to lessons and embedded assignments; and 3.) a printable copy of the course syllabus.





Course Information: EDU 312, The Teaching of Mathematics and Science in the Elementary School
Course Number #: 1333
Semester: Fall 2016
Course Times: T - Th, 9:00 - 13:00
Total Credit hrs: 3
Location: A.J. Schmidt Elementary School, Angola, NY 14006

Instructor: Chris T. Shively, Ph.D.
Office: Bacon 316C
Phone/Text: 716.861.5057 (text me before calling and tell me who you are in your text)
Email: shivelct@buffalostate.edu
Office Hours: By appt. on Mondays & Friday and 14:00 – 16:00 on Wednesdays in my office.

Description

As part of Buffalo State’s elementary education requirements, this six-credit course is designed to provide an integrated, holistic experience that will better prepare pre-service teachers for the complex task of educating children. This experience is intended to be one phase of a path toward professional growth and development. This course integrates university assignments and hours of classroom field experience in Professional Development Schools. For all junior participants, each day at the PDS Site may consist of observing, planning teaching, reflecting, learning and sharing.

Relationship to Teacher Education Program Conceptual Model

The preparation of reflective facilitators of learning at Buffalo State College is anchored in a foundation of professional knowledge – knowledge of the learner (i.e., students in the schools) and his/her characteristics, knowledge of the content to be taught, and knowledge of pedagogy. Course objectives for EDU 312 address all three components of the conceptual model:

1. Knowledge of the learner. EDU 312 Teacher Candidate will
  • a. Demonstrate an understanding of developmental levels of mathematics, and science of children preK-6.
  • b. Evaluate and assess student learning and reasoning processes in mathematics and science.
  • c. Differentiate instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners.
2. Knowledge of content EDU 312 Teacher Candidates will
  • a. Utilize Learning Standards in Mathematics and Science to design and assess instruction.
  • b. Demonstrate understanding of mathematics and science content by planning and teaching effective lessons.
3. Knowledge of pedagogy EDU 312 Teacher candidates will
  • a. Use effective instructional strategies and materials for teaching mathematics, and science, in field placements.
  • b. Analyze historical and current educational research and initiatives to improve teaching practices.
  • c. Use information technology during instruction to make learning more effective.
  • d. Develop and utilize teaching strategies that respect diverse backgrounds, interests and abilities of the learners.
4. Reflection – The Teacher candidate will exhibit the ability to reflect and assess his/her own effectiveness, and systematically make adjustments to improve and strengthen areas needing attention.
5. Dispositions – The Teacher candidate will demonstrate respect for learner differences, commitment to own personal growth, and engage in short and long-term planning.
6. Diversity – The Teacher candidate will be aware of and be sensitive to diversity issues and use culturally and socially responsive pedagogy.

Buffalo State PDS Mission Statement

The Professional Development School (PDS) project of the Department of Elementary Education and Reading at Buffalo State is a collaborative partnership effort achieved as college faculty, school administrators, and practicing teachers deliberate on how to (1) cooperatively supervise pre-service teachers and provide closer connections to classroom practice; (2) promote professional development for in-service teachers; (3) improve student learning; and (4) research the problems of educational practice.

A Professional Development School is defined as an elementary school where school and university personnel are in partnership to facilitate high levels of learning by all children enrolled in the school, to promote a more optimal school environment for preparing a cohort of pre-service teachers, and to create a more supportive site for renewal of and inquiry by experienced teachers, administrators, school service personnel, and college faculty. Through collaborative efforts involving pupils, school personnel, junior participants (JPs), and college faculty, a PDS continuously evolves into an increasingly exemplary learning environment.

Objectives and Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of EDU 312, Teacher Candidates will:
  1. encourage students to explain their thinking to promote conceptual understanding, procedural fluency and mathematical reasoning
  2. conduct daily cumulative review of critical and prerequisite skills and concepts at the beginning of every lesson.
  3. stimulate alternative approaches to solving mathematics problems so that students are taught that mathematics is a sense-making process for understanding
  4. provide multiple representations – for example, models, diagrams, number lines, tables and graphs, as well as symbols – of all mathematical work to support the visualization of skills and concepts.
  5. create language-rich mathematics classrooms that emphasize terminology, vocabulary, explanations and solutions.
  6. develop number sense among their students by asking for, and justifying, estimates, mental calculations and equivalent forms of numbers.
  7. connect mathematical learning to the real world.
  8. design and implement formative assessments that inform instruction
  9. carefully plan lessons and units, which includes the tasks, the activities, the questions and the assessments

At the conclusion of EDU 312, Teacher Candidates will:
  1. select science content and adapt & design curricula to meet the interests, knowledge, understanding, abilities and experience of students
  2. select teaching and assessment strategies that support the development of student understanding and nurture a community of science learners
  3. orchestrate discourse among students about scientific ideas
  4. encourage and model the skills of scientific inquiry, as well as the curiosity, openness to new ideas and data, and skepticism that characterize science
  5. use multiple methods and systematically gather data about student understanding and ability
  6. make the available science tools, materials, media, and technological resources accessible to students
  7. display and demand respect for the diverse ideas, skills, and experiences of all students

Materials

Required Texts. None. The professor will provide the necessary reading materials.

Suggested Reading:
  1. Mathematics
    1. Teaching Children Mathematics (K - 5)
    2. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School ( 6 - 8)
    3. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education (K - 21)
  2. Science
    1. Science and Children (K - 5)
    2. Science Scope (6 - 8)
    3. Journal of Research in Science Teaching

Technology
  1. Google Drive: Docs, Sheets & Slides
  2. VoiceThread
  3. Cmap Cloud

Schedule of Topics

Week 1, 8/30/2016 - 9/01/2016
8/30 - Prepare for EDU 312

9/2 - Design a sequence of mathematical lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal

Week 2, 9/6/2016 - 9/8/2016
9/6 - Design a sequence of science lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another

9/8 - Design a sequence of mathematical lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal

Week 3, 9/13/2016 - 9/15/2016
9/13 - - Design a sequence of science lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another

9/15 - Design a sequence of mathematical lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal

Week 4, 9/20/2016 - 9/22/2016
9/20 - - Design a sequence of science lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another

9/22 - Design a sequence of mathematical lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal

Week 5, 9/27/2016 - 9/29/2016
9/27 - - Design a sequence of science lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another

9/29 - Design a sequence of mathematical lessons towards a specific learning outcome around this standard: Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal

Week 6, 10/04/2016 - 10/06/2016
10/4 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

10/6 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 7, 10/11/2016 - 10/13/2016
10/11 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

10/13 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 8, 10/18/2016 - 10/20/2016
10/18 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

10/20 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 9, 10/25/2016 - 10/27/2016
10/25 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

10/27 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 10, 11/01/2016 - 11/03/2016
11/1 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

11/3 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 11, 11/08/2016 - 11/10/2016
11/08 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

11/10 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 12, 11/15/2016 - 11/17/2016
11/15 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

11/17 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 13, 11/22/2016 - 11/24/2016
11/22 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

11/24 - Thanksgiving, No Class

Week 14, 11/29/2016 - 12/01/2016
11/29 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

12/01 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products

Week 15, 12/06/2016 - 12/08/2016
12/06 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom

12/08 - Teaching in your A.J. Schmidt Classroom
  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal
  2. Engaged Explorations
  3. Math Modules Homework Products
  4. Sending Codes by Light Science Unit is due
  5. edTPA, Task 4 is due

Week 16, 12/13/2016 - 12/15/2016
12/13 - Critique and Evaluation Period

12/15 - Critique and Evaluation Period

Explanation of Out-of-Class Assignments


  1. High Leverage Practice Reflection Journal - Weekly
    1. Teacher candidates will use VoiceThread to explain how a teacher they observed and/or how they addressed 1 of 17 High Leverage Practices.
      1. they will respond to a prompt provided by Dr. Shively using the text comment feature of VoiceThread
      2. a rubric will be provided to guide their writing
  2. Engaged Explorations - Weekly
    1. Teacher Candidates will write an Engaged Exploration (Adams, Reid, LeMaster, & McKagan, 2008) for a PhET (Physics Education Technology) Online Science Simulation
      1. they will create their Engaged Exploration in a Google Document and save their work to a shared Google Folder called Engaged Explorations
      2. a rubric will be provided to guide their Engaged Explorations
  3. Sending Codes by Light Science Unit- Semester
    1. Teacher Candidates will complete all learning tasks in a STEM unit designed by previous teacher candidates and given to 5th grade students.
    2. They will also read research that supports the pedagogy of the STEM unit
    3. a rubric will be provided to guide their work
  4. Math Modules Homework Products - Weekly
    1. Teacher candidates will complete the same homework problems that their students complete for each week they are teaching
    2. a rubric will be provided to guide their work
  5. New York State Seience Exams - Semester
    1. Teacher candidates will examine 5 years of 4th grade and 8th grade science exams. During this examination, they will:
      1. identify the top 5 most commonly assessed New York State standards
      2. match the identified standards with a Next Generation Science Standard
      3. share their findings with the cooperating teacher
  6. Collaboration with Parents - Semester - Taskstream
    1. “Parents are their children’s first and most influential teachers. What parents do to help their children is more important to academic success than how well off the family is.” -U.S. Dept. of Education, (1966).From What Works About Teaching and Learning
    2. Each EDU 312 teacher candidate is required to complete one project in which he/she interacts professionally with the families of students to promote the academic, social and emotional growth of children. Candidates must demonstrate an understanding of appropriate, respectful and productive communication with families—one that also takes cultural and linguistic differences into account.
    3. Candidates must also demonstrate initiative in creating new avenues for connections/communications with families from diverse backgrounds that is meaningful, thus promoting opportunities for active involvement of all families. This may include but is not limited to: family learning projects, (e.g., math or science homework assignment that involves the family, family math kit with games and manipulatives, science/math packet with literature piece and brief activity description, or kitchen science activity), a web page with math science links (e.g., homework hotline, games on line or newsletter), and/or utilizing parents in class projects. This will be discussed further with your instructor.
    4. Each candidate must provide the following (following the conventions of standard written English):
      1. Description of the project in detail (see examples above). Include objectives and standards (New York State, NCTM and/ or NSES). (ACEI 1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4)
      2. A copy of your written correspondence to parents and directions given for the family activity. Include documentation of family correspondence (e.g., Parent/Guardian survey, sign off sheet, evaluation/comment form, other parent feedback). (ACEI 3.5, 5.1, 5.3, 5.4)
      3. Candidate reflection of Collaboration with Families project. What went well, what would you do differently (e.g., was the content presented clearly; did the parents understand the goals/objectives; were the students motivated, engaged; what was the impact on students’ learning?) What did you gain as an educator from this project? Include artifacts such as student samples, photos, students’ reflections. After reviewing all of your correspondence with families, how would you interpret the effects of family involvement on student academic, social, and emotional growth in the content area of Mathematics/and or Science? (ACEI 1, 2.2, 2.3, 4, 5.1, 5.2)
  7. edTPA, Task 4 - Semester - Taskstream
    1. complete Task 4 of the edTPA for Math using real student data taken from a 4th grade rural classroom
    2. edTPA rubrics will be used to assess their work

Evaluation of Your Work

This course is based on a percentage of the total number of points you accumulate. Your grade is not determined on a 100-point scale. It is very common for the course point total to be over 100 points. Please do not try to calculate your grade based on a 100-point scale.
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Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 10.02.53.png

Formative Assessments. I believe assessment should be used to improve student achievement and not just as a tool to obtain data or determine a grade. In my course, you will be provided with formative assessments, in the form of rubrics, to help you.

If you are not sure what formative assessment means, Dr. W. James Popham, said that a
formative assessment:
  • is a PROCESS and not a test
  • should be used by teachers AND students
  • takes place DURING instruction
  • provides FEEDBACK to teachers and students
  • the "feedback should be used to ADJUST a teacher's instruction or to ADJUST a student's learning tactics" or BOTH (Popham, 2008, p. 5, emphasis mine)

Coursework - Evaluation Procedure. In order for me to see if you have met my learning objectives for any assignment, you will be asked to demonstrate what you have learned by creating some type of product. Here is a sequential list of the work-evaluation procedure you will follow during my course.
  1. Read the assignment
  2. Preview the rubric to see how the project will be evaluated
  3. Begin the assignment and refer to the rubric as you work on the project
  4. Use the rubric at the end of the project to evaluate yourself
  5. Place the rubric in the Google folder you shared with me
  6. I will use the rubric to evaluate your work
  7. I will send you an email notifying you that I am done evaluating your rubric
  8. You will use the feedback from the rubric to improve your score, if necessary
  9. If you need to resubmit your work, follow my directions from my email
I will re-evaluate your work & rubric and send you an email notification

Attendance

Attendance is required in both the college classroom and the elementary classroom. If you miss a day at A.J. Schmidt Elementary School, that day must be made up. Arrangements must be made between you, your cooperating teacher and me. If you do not make arrangements, you will be penalized 5 points off your final average.

Academic Dishonesty Policy

Candidates who engage in plagiarism, cheating on examinations, submit the same work as other candidates, unauthorized collaboration, falsification and/or any other violation of academic integrity will receive an “E” grade in the course. Buffalo State has a campus wide license to Turnitin for unlimited submissions of student papers for plagiarism detection.

The Academic Misconduct Policy is posted online at www.buffalostate.edu/studentaffairs/x522.xml. Buffalo State official procedures for academic misconduct are online at: www.buffalostate.edu/academicaffairs/x607.xml. An official explanation of what constitutes plagiarism and student resources may be found at: http://www.buffalostate.edu/professionaldevelopment/x702.xml.

Academic Integrity Policies and Procedures (August 28, 2006). The Graduate School University at Buffalo. Retrieved August, 2009 from http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/academicintegrity.php#preable

Students with Disabilities

Any student who requires accommodations to complete the requirements and expectations of this course because of a disability is invited to make his or her needs known to the instructor and to the director of the Disabilities Services Office, 120 South Wing, 878-4500.‖
(See www.buffalostate.edu/offices/disabilityservices/fac-syllabus.htm)

Incomplete Grades


I do not give incomplete grades. I urge students to make note of the dates for dropping a course without penalty. If students find they are not able to work at the level required for this course for whatever reason, students may drop the course without penalty up to a certain point in the semester. Know that point and know your limitations and my expectations. In any case, students should contact me if there are potential difficulties. My contact information is located on the first page of the syllabus so please contact me as needed – I am here to help you.

TEU Field Experience Policy

According to the New York State Education Department (NYSED), traditional, active registered teacher education programs "shall include at least 100 clock hours of field experiences related to coursework prior to student teaching... At least 15 of the 100 clock hours of field experience shall include a focus on understanding the needs of students with disabilities".

During this course, at least 0 field experience hours must be logged by each candidate. Hours which include focus on understanding students with disabilities should be clearly annotated. An example field log as well as the evaluative rubric are included with this syllabus

Expectations for Behavior and Procedures for Disruptive Individuals

All candidates are expected to comport themselves in a manner that does not convey to others in the college community any disrespect, intolerance or rude behavior based upon age, race, religion, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or status – either marital, veteran or socioeconomic. All members of the college community are expected to contribute to the college environment and to move the college community toward respect for all.
OR
Procedures Regarding Disruptive Individuals: Disruptive behavior by students in my class will not be tolerated. Whenever I deem a student to be acting in a disruptive or threatening manner, I will exercise my right to ask that individual to leave the classroom. If refused, I will exercise my right to notify University Police. The responding officer will determine whether an arrest should be made or whether a referral to medical or counseling staff is appropriate. If a student is perceived as a danger to himself, herself, or others, the dean of students may propose an interim suspension until a hearing is held. Any student removed from class will have the right to a hearing.
(see www.buffalostate.edu/offices/stuaffr/academicpolicies/codeofrights.html)
Note: Cell phones and pagers must be turned off upon entering the classroom or laboratory. You will be asked to withdraw from the class if disruption occurs more than one (1) time.

EU TASKSTREAM POLICY

TaskStream LAT: Learning Achievement Tool
Buffalo State College teacher education programs collect and document candidate performance using an online tool called TaskStream. TaskStream enables faculty and administrators to assess individual candidate progress and overall program performance across the Teacher Education Unit. Constantly reviewing and improving the quality of these programs is essential to preparing highly qualified teacher education candidates’ ability to positively impact P-12 student learning. The Teacher Education Unit is accredited by the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

In this course, all candidates are required to submit particular assignments via TaskStream; these assignments include the following: [insert required TaskStream assignment(s) here]. These assignments must be submitted via TaskStream. Candidates failing to submit required assignments via TaskStream will earn an Incomplete course grade (I) until the work is completed and (appropriately) submitted. All candidates must be enrolled in their program on TaskStream within 30 days of beginning the course. All required TaskStream course assignments must be submitted on TaskStream by the end of the semester.

If candidates have never previously used TaskStream at Buffalo State or if candidates are registered in a different teacher education program, they will need to create a personal user account. The course instructor will provide an account activation key code. Once candidates have created their accounts, candidates will not need to repeat this process. Candidate enrollment will automatically be carried over into subsequent semesters.

If candidates have used TaskStream at Buffalo State in the past and are continuing in the same program, candidates must make sure that their accounts are still active and that they are enrolled in the correct program. Candidates must use the instructor provided codes if necessary. Candidates are responsible for keeping the account activation key code in a secure spot for future reference. Key codes can only be provided by Buffalo State College.

Additional information, including a schedule of webinars designed to guide candidates through the TaskStream registration process and work submission processes, is available from the course instructor. Candidates should to contact TaskStream directly (1-800- 311-5656 or online at www.taskstream.com) for assistance. Limited on-campus support is available by emailing BSCTaskStreamHelp@buffalostate.edu.