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    • "PSTs [preservice teachers] reported they did not recall using tools like computers, probes, or other inquiry tools in their Kindergarten - College Graduate learning of science. They recalled only listening to lectures, taking notes and completing homework problems and worksheets." (Shively & Yerrick, 2014, p. 6).

Overview

This is the EDU 375 course home page and it is divided into 3 sections. On this wikipage, you will find: 1.) course information; 2.) the topics of the course, links to lessons and embedded assignments; and 3.) the course syllabus.

Section 1

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Section 2 - Topical Calendar


January 4 - 10 | January 11 - 17 | January 18 - 22

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January 4 - 10
4 - Base Camp - Setup Your Learning for this course
(all links will open in a new tab - close each tab when you are done with them)
Due Date: 1/4/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)

5 - Technology as a Social Practice
Due Date: 1/7/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)
  • 1. Login to Wikispaces
  • 2. Join the Technology as a Social Practice Wiki by - clicking here -
  • 3. Visit the Technology as a Social Practice Wiki
  • 4. Assessment
    • a. rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • b. place the completed rubric in the dropbox folder you shared with me (it should say something similar to this: chrisEDU375 - exempt your name is present and not mine)

8 - Develop a Classroom Wikispace (Flipped Classroom)
Due Date: 1/10/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)
  • 1. Make sure you are logged into Wikispaces
Please note: Links are designed to open in new tabs. I do this so that you can work on tasks on a wikipage in a new tab and then close that tab when you are done.

January 11 - 17
11 - Learn with Interactive Multimedia Learning Environments (IMMLE)
Due Date: 1/13/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)
  • 1. Make sure you are are logged into Wikispaces

Teacher Name's
Classroom Wikispace
Anthony

Brianna

Cassidy

Dereka

Jessica

Krystle

Nailah

Rukiya

Tiara
http://adamoedu375.wikispaces.com

http://briannaedu375.wikispaces.com/

http://cassanderson5151.wikispaces.com/

http://derekaedu375.wikispaces.com

http://zaideljessica.wikispaces.com/

http://krystleedu375.wikispaces.com/

http://nailahedu375.wikispaces.com/

http://rukiyalm.wikispaces.com

http://tiaraedu375.wikispaces.com/


13 - Learn with Concept Mapping (CM) Software, Part I
Due Date: 1/15/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)

15 - Learn with Concept Mapping (CM) Software, Part II
Due Date: 1/18/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)


January 18 - 22
18 - Teach ELA with an IMMLE and CM
Due Date: 1/20/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)

  • 4. Build a Concept Map
    • a. Login to Cmap Cloud
    • b. Create a concept map with the following propositions from these 9 - 10 Common Core Writing Standards (propositions are in red, below the standards)
      • W.9-10.1 - Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
      • W.9-10.1.A - Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
      • W. 9-10.1.B - Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
      • W.9-10.1.C - Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
      • W.9-10.1.D - Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
      • W.9-10.1.E - Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
    • c. Propositions
      • 1. Arguments are supported by claims
      • 2. Arguments require a formal style
      • 3. Arguments require an objective tone
      • 4. Arguments require a concluding statement

      • 5. Claims are debatable statements
      • 6. Claims come in different types such as fact or definition, cause and effect, value, or solutions or policies
      • 7. Example
    • d. Use a rubric to guide your work
      • 1. rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • 2. place the completed rubric in the dropbox folder you shared with me

  • 5. Teach an ELA Module with a Concept Map
    • Note: It is impossible for me to to teach you everything you could do with technology in an ELA lesson. Where would I start? Grade K - Grade 12? Would I choose Reading or Writing? Should I teach you how to use technology in an ELA lesson that involves content (Science, Math, SS)? I think you get the picture....
    • Note 2: Therefore, I am showing you a generic way to use your wikispace as an Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment that you can use with grades 3 and up

    • a. Model a Writing to Improve Comprehension Strategy on Your Wikispace (rubric is on this wikipage)


20 - Teach Math with IMMLEs and CM
Due Date: 1/22/2016 at 23:59:59 (11:59:59 PM)

    • b. Create a concept map with the following Common Core Math Standards
NOTE: I am not showing you an example, you create the concept map
      • (i.) 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a "hundred."
      • (ii.) Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.
      • (iii.) 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a "ten."
      • (iv.) The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

    • c. Use a rubric to guide your work
      • 1. rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • 2. place the completed rubric in the dropbox folder you shared with me

  • 4. Teach a Math Module with a IMMLE
    • Note: It is impossible for me to to teach you everything you could do with technology in a Math lesson. Where would I start? Grade K - Grade 12?

    • a. Many school districts in New York State use the EngageNY math modules to teach math
    • b. I teach EDU 312 (Math & Science methods) at a school that uses the math modules
    • c. For this task, you must:
      • (i.) pretend you are a 2nd grade teacher
      • (ii.) pretend that you have students in your classroom who have difficulty drawing on a worksheet
      • (iii.) use your classroom wikispace
      • (iv.) read a 2nd grade math module - by clicking here -
      • (v.) pretend that you are going to teach that math module to your students
      • (vi.) pretend that your students have access to technology that enables them to view web sites
      • (vii.) Use your classroom wikipage to direct your students - to this IMMLE -
      • (vii.) Model the problem set, on p. 21, using the IMMLE
      • (ix). Take screenshots of your models
      • (x.) place the screenshots in the dropbox folder you shared with me
      • (xi.) see my examples -
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
        , #2
      • (xii.) Use a rubric to guide your work
        • A. rubric:
          File Not Found
          File Not Found
        • B. place the completed rubric in the dropbox folder you shared with me

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OPTIONAL - DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD YOUR GRADE**//
22 - Teach Science with IMMLEs and CM
  1. Will be released on 1/22/2016

Section 3




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  1. ^ Since we only meet online, you will not be able to experience an authentic flipped classroom