• "Students become mathematically fluent thinkers when they have many occasions to make sense of problems and apply their understandings toward increasingly sophisticated problems." (Matney, 2014, p. 34).

Overview

This is the EDU 417 course home page and it is divided into 3 sections. On this wikipage, you will find: 1.) course information; 2.) the topics of the course, links to lessons and embedded assignments; and 3.) the course syllabus.

Section 1

Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015, 17:00 - 19:40
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Section 2 - Topical Calendar


September | October | November | December
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September

September 3, 2015,


September 10, 2015, Due Date: 9/17/2015 by 23:59:59



September 17, 2015, Due Date: 9/24/2015 by 23:59:59

  • 1. Literacy in Math (online)
    • Tips for learning: There are 7 sections to complete this week; two of them will be graded by you and me. Please do not skim the directions, take your time and do a little bit of work each day.
    • a. Wikispaces
      • (i.) Make sure you are logged into Wikispaces
      • (ii.) Join the Literacy Wiki by clicking on this link: https://wikispaces.com/join/JN7DKKK (this link will open in a new tab, after you click the link, close the tab)

    • b. Teach the Whole Student in Math
      • (i.) Last week we read about anxious math students
      • (ii.) For this week, I would like you to analyze my use of the About/Point Writing Strategy in an Algebra lesson
      • (iii.) Click this link - Teach the Whole Student - to conduct your analysis

    • c. Find Math Text to Work with this Semester from EngageNY
      • (i.) In order to apply the reading and writing strategies you will learn this semester, you need some text
      • (ii.) Follow the directions on this link - Engage NY - to learn about EngageNY and to locate text for the semester
      • (iii.) You do not need to do anything with the text you choose, I just want you to become familiar with the material and how to access it

    • d. Study a Concept Map About How People Begin to Read
      • (i.) Use a rubric to guide your work in this section
        • 1. rubric:
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          File Not Found
        • 2. Complete the rubric and place it in the Dropbox folder you shared with me
      • (ii.) Use the About/Point Writing Strategy to understand how people read

    • e. Scaffolding Instruction for ELLs: Resource Guide for Mathematics
      • (i.) Use the About/Point Writing Strategy to help you comprehend the section of the article below called: Teach Academic Vocabulary on p. 3 - 4
      • (ii.) Bring your About/Point Writing Strategy to class on 9/24
      • (iii.) Use this document:
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    • f. Address the Text Needs of All Learners in Your Classroom with Universal Design for Learning Principles
      • (i.) Use the About/Point Writing Strategy to begin comprehending the concept of Universal Design for Learning
      • (ii.) Bring your About/Point Writing Strategy to class on 9/24
      • (iii.) Use this document: Principles of Universal Design for Learning - you do not need to click any of the links on the preceding document for your About/Point Writing Strategy

    • g. The Reading Apprenticeship Framework
      • (i.) Use the About/Point Writing Strategy to begin comprehending the Reading Apprenticeship Framework
      • (ii.) Bring your About/Point Writing Strategy to class on 9/24
      • (iii.) Use the following link: Reading Apprenticeship Framework Introduction


September 24, 2015, Due Date: 10/1/2015 by 23:59:59

  • 1. Literacy in Math
    Strategic Network in the Brain
    Strategic Network in the Brain
    • a. Responding to Literacy Development Work Completed at Home
      • (i.) To promote the strategic learning network, please show us the main ideas of the concept maps you read last week about learning how to read. Here are your options:
        • I. Draw several ideas
        • II. Create an outline
        • III. Other

    • b. Literacy in the Act of Teaching
      • (i.) Solve
      • algebra-i-m1-topic-a-lesson-2-student_pdf__page_2_of_5_.png

      • (ii.) How might this lesson fall apart with English Language Learners?

      • (iii.) Use the About/Point Writing Strategy to read p. 146 - 148 of Differentiating Instruction in Mathematics for the English Language Learner
      • File Not Found
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      • (iv.) How can we teach:
        • (A.) for Comprehensible Input?
        • (B.) with Contextualized Instruction?
        • (C.) in a low-anxiety environment?
        • (D.) using meaningful learning activities?



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October
October 1, 2015
Due Date: 10/8/2015 by 23:59:59
  • 1. Literacy in Math (online)
    • 1. Wikispaces
      • (a.) Make sure you are logged into Wikispaces
    • 2. Teach the Whole Student in Math
      • (b.) Participate in an IRIS module about Secondary Reading Instruction (Part 1): Teaching Vocabulary and Comprehension in the Content Areas

October 8, 2015,
Due Date: 10/15/2015 by 23:59:59
Literacy in Math
  • A. Teaching the Whole Student
    • (1.) The Reading Apprenticeship Framework
      • a. Schoenbach, Greenleaf, & Murphy (2012) claim:
        • (i.) Reading is a complex process.
        • (ii.) Reading is problem solving.
        • (iii.) Fluent reading is not the same as decoding.
        • (iv.) Reading proficiency varies with situation and experience.
        • (v.) Proficient readers share some key characteristics.
      • b. Begin examining the complexity of reading by - clicking here - and following the directions on that wikipage

    • (2.) Scaffolding Instruction for ELLs

  • B. Literacy in the Act of Teaching Math
    • 1. Study a math problem based on two views of reading: 1.) a reader sees virtually all of the print on the page and 2.) readers selectively “pick” from the print
      • (i.) Examine an algebra problem from the lens: a reader sees virtually all of the print on the page
        • a. If a reader was connected to an eye-scanner while reading, what words would their eyes stop (fixate) upon?
        • b. If you were teaching English Language Learners and using one of the Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English Strategy (SDAIE), teach academic language(Murrey, 2008), what academic language would you teach your students to promote comprehensible input?
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      • (ii.) Examine the algebra problem (above) from the lens: readers selectively “pick” from the print
        • a. If a reader was connected to an eye-scanner while reading, what words or letters would their eyes stop (fixate) upon?
        • b. If you were teaching English Language Learners and using one of the Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English Strategy (SDAIE), use manipulatives(Murrey, 2008), what manipulatives would you use to promote comprehensible input?
    • 2. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the rubric in the dropbox folder you shared with me

October 15, 2015,Due Date: 10/22/2015 by 23:59:59
  • 1. Literacy in Math (online)
    • 1. Wikispaces
      • (a.) Make sure you are logged into Wikispaces
    • 2. Teach the Whole Student in Math
      • (a.) Participate in an IRIS module about Secondary Reading Instruction (Part 2): Deepening Middle School Content-Area Learning with Vocabulary and Comprehension Strategies by clicking here - http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/sec-rdng2/#content -
      • (b.) Complete a survey/quiz that I will use for a grade
        • A. Link to the survey: - click here -
        • B. Please note: I encourage you to open the module in a tab and the survey in a tab.
        • C. Please note: I discourage you from reading the module and then taking the survey
        • D. Please note: The survey is worth 19 points toward your grade


October 22, 2015, Due Date: 10/29/2015 by 23:59:59

1. Revisit your Personal Learning Goals about Developing Literacy in Math
  • a. Have you met any of them?

2. The Science of Developing Literacy in Secondary Math, Building Vocabulary
  • a. Read 1 (one) of the following articles and use the About/Point Writing to Improve Comprehension Strategy
    • Bay-Williams, J. M., & Livers, S. (2009). Supporting MATH Vocabulary acquisition. Teaching Children Mathematics, 16(4), 238 – 245.

    • Downing, J. A., Earles-Vollrath, T., Lee, H.-J., & Herner-Patnode, L. M. (2007). Teaching Mathematics Vocabulary to Diverse Groups. Intervention in School and Clinic, 43(2), 121–126.

    • Dunston, P. J., & Tyminski, A. M. (2013). What’s the Big Deal about Vocabulary? Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 19(1), 38 – 45.

    • Gay, A. S. (2008). Helping Teachers Connect Vocabulary and Conceptual Understanding. The Mathematics Teacher, 102(3), 218 – 223.

    • Livers, S. D., & Bay-Williams, J. M. (2014). Vocabulary Support: Constructing (Not Obstructing) Meaning. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 20(3), 152 – 159.

    • Roberts, N. S., & Truxaw, M. P. (2013). For ELLs: Vocabulary beyond the Definitions. Mathematics Teacher, 107(1), 28 – 34.

    • Thompson, D. R., & Rubenstein, R. N. (2000). Learning Mathematics Vocabulary: Potential Pitfalls and Instructional Strategies. The Mathematics Teacher, 93(7), 568 – 574.

  • b. Articles are in a google folder I shared with you called EDU 417 Developing Literacy in Math - here is a preview of the folder
  • c. Directions for using the About/Point Writing to Improve Comprehension Strategy are on slide 2 of the google presentation called Developing Vocabulary in Math which is in the Google folder I shared with you. The presentation looks like this:
  • d. Provide me with evidence that you used the About/Point Writing to Improve Comprehension Strategy by adding your About/Point Strategy to the shared Google Presentation located in the google folder I shared with you. Look at my example on slides 3 and 4.
    • (i.) rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • (ii.) place the rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

  • 3. The Art of Developing Literacy in Secondary Math
    • a. Find an Illuminations simulation in your field to use for next week's class - click here -
    • b. Learn how to use the simulation because we are going to do vocabulary work with it next week

October 29, 2015, Due Date: Due Date: 11/01/2015 by 23:59:59

Literacy in Math (online)
  • a. Use the R.A.F.T. Writing to Improve Comprehension Strategy to Summarize the Information from the articles
    • (i.) Learn about R.A.F.T. on the Literacy Wiki by - clicking here -
    • (ii.) ROLE: Assume the role of a high school or middle school math teacher in a real school
    • (iii.) AUDIENCE, FORMAT & TOPIC: Compose an email to your fellow math teachers that explain the main points of all the articles
    • (iv.) Use a rubric to guide your R.A.F.T.
      • A. rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • B. place the rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

  • b. Use Concrete Models to Introduce Abstract Concepts & Increase Vocabulary
    • (i.) Read an article called Using Homemade Algebra Tiles to Develop Algebra and Prealgebra Concepts and follow the directions on the wikipage by - clicking here -

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November

November 5, 2015, Due Date: 11/12/2015 by 23:59:59

  • 1. Review data that indicates that enrollment rates are increasing for students with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) & contribute to this data set by - clicking here -

  • 2. Annotate a module lesson to describe how you would teach this module to students with LEP - by clicking here -

November 12, 2015, Due Date: 11/19/2015 by 23:59:59

  • 1. Writing Activities are not Writing Strategies - read one by clicking here -

November 19, 2015, Due Date: 12/3/2015 by 23:59:59


November 26, 2015, Fall Recess, No Class


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December

December 3, 2015, Due Date: 12/10/2015 by 23:59:59

December 10, 2015, Due Date:12/17/2015 by 23:59:59

  • 1. cancelled -

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Section 3

Syllabus - this wikipage is the syllabus

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Describe how literacy develops in individuals from the middle to secondary school years.
  • 2. Describe the multiple literacies of students, including academic literacy, cultural literacy, and technological literacy.
  • 3. Exhibit a working knowledge of a variety of literacy strategies that promote comprehension, vocabulary development, writing, and study skills that can be incorporated into content area instruction.
  • 4. Recognize specific reading problems students encounter related to each content area, such as specialized vocabulary, difficult concepts, graphic materials and symbols.
  • 5. Apply their knowledge to design lessons that incorporate a variety of literacy strategies into content area instruction.
  • 6. Demonstrate how to use a wide variety of resources including media and technology in the content areas to facilitate student learning.
  • 7. Recognize the wide variety of interests, backgrounds, and abilities of students and know how to group and differentiate assignments for optimal instruction.
  • 8. Develop strategies that promote responsibility, motivation, and an appreciation for diversity.
  • 9. Apply informal assessment techniques to assess the literacy abilities and needs within the content areas.
  • 10. Critically read and respond to scholarly work focusing on literacy in the content areas.
  • 11. Synthesize literature on a specific aspect of content area literacy instruction.

Course Description
  • An analysis of literacy in the content areas in intermediate grades and beyond. Topics to be discussed include: reading and writing processes, reading and writing skills, and strategies for assessing and developing adolescents’ reading and writing in the content areas.

  • Evaluation Procedure
    • This course is based on a percentage of the total number of points you accumulate. Your grade is not determined on a 100-point scale. It is very common for the course point total to be over 100 points. Please do not try to calculate your grade based on a 100-point scale.
    • 95% - 100% -->A
    • 90% - 94% -->A-
    • 87% - 89% -->B+
    • 84% - 86% -->B
    • 80% - 83% -->B-
    • 77% - 79% -->C+
    • 74% - 76% -->C
    • 70% - 73% -->C-
    • 67% - 69% -->D+
    • 64% - 66% -->D
    • LESS THAN 64% -->E

Section 4

Wikispaces Help