• "...writing teaches writers how to write— and how not to write" (Gallagher & Lee, 2008, p. 3).

    • "Sometimes the ideas just come to me. Other times I have to sweat and almost bleed to make ideas come. It's a mysterious process, but I hope I never find out exactly how it works" (J.K. Rowling)

Overview

This is the EDU 535 course home page and it is divided into 4 sections. On this wikipage, you will find: 1.) course information; 2.) the topics of the course and links to lessons taught in class, and 3.) the course syllabus.

Section 1

^ Jun 27, 2016 - Jul 22, 2016

Section 2 - Topical Calendar

Week 1: June 28 - 30 | Week 2: July 5 - 7 | Week 3: July 12 - 14 | Week 4: July 19 - 21
external image 3.%20Crest%20Logo%20in%20Circle_2CB.jpg













Week 1: June 28 - 30, The Writer in You
Due Date: 7/04/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 2 rubrics for this week.
28 - Base Camp - Setup Your Learning for this course
DO NOT CREATE YOUR OWN VOICETHREAD LOGIN
1.)

29 - Beliefs about Writing
1.) Explore your beliefs about writing

30 - 200 Minutes of Writing about Great Expectations (Writer's Workshop)
1.) Study Charles Dickens' masterpiece about writing about it
2.) This assignment will be continued throughout the course
3.) Click on the book below to visit the assignment page.
great-expectations.jpg


Week 2: July 5 - 7, Writing in Grades K - 6
Due Date: 7/11/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 7 rubrics for this week.
5 -
1. "Preschool Teachers and Children’s Emergent Writing: Supporting Diverse Learners" - Research & Writing
  • (a.) Early childhood educators should also become familiar with developmental stages of writing for young children, including facilitation techniques for teachers. (Dennis & Votteler, 2013) - you can read more by clicking here -

2. "Big Paper" - Research & Writing
  • (a.) "Big Paper began with a teacher in a Head Start preschool classroom as a way to engage all of her students, some of whom had behavioral, intellectual, and/or mild physical disabilities, in an inclusive, constructive, developmentally appropriate writing activity." (Edmister, Staples, Huber, & Garrett, 2013, p. 26) - you can read more by clicking here -


Screen Shot 2016-07-05 at 16.05.33.png3. "The Language of Mathematics" (Bruun, Diaz, & Dykes, 2015) + "Vocabulary Intervention for Kindergarten Students: Comparing Extended Instruction to Embedded Instruction and Incidental Exposure" (Coyne, McCoach, & Kapp, 2007) Research & Writing
(a.) "Vocabulary instruction is as important to math comprehension as it is to reading comprehension, especially because so much of today’s math instruction and testing are administered using story problems. No longer are students expected to calculate a numerical problem only. " (Brunn et al., 2015, p. 532)
(b.) "Children begin kindergarten with important differences in vocabulary knowledge. While some children enter schools with thousands of hours of exposures to books and a wealth of rich and supportive oral language experiences, others begin school with very limited knowledge of language and word meanings (Hart & Risley,1995; National ResearchCouncil, 1998) (as cited in Coyne et al., 2007, p. 74)
(c.) - you can read more about these ideas by clicking here -

4. Gradebook
  • a. Travel this trail of learning to learn about the value of keeping a gradebook for yourself

6 -
1. "Storytelling as a Way into Writing in Kindergarten" (Horn, 2005) - Research & Writing
  • (a.) "Many children come to school telling stories. Some do not. Most, however, come to school talking, and I believe that if you can talk, you can tell a story." (Horn, 2005, p. 35) - you can read more by clicking here -

2. "Drawing to support writing development in English language learners" (Adoniou, 2013) - Research & Writing
  • (i.) "In this article, drawing is presented as an effective strategy for teaching writing based on the hypothesis that drawing and writing are comparable semiotic systems and learning is most powerful when these semiotic systems work together." (Adoniou, 2013, p. 261 )
    • 1.) Use the R.A.F.T. Writing Strategy to help you understand an article called - by clicking here -
    • 2.) Practice using drawing to support writing with a science simulation - by clicking here -

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3. "Collaborative Blogging as a Means to Develop Elementary Expository Writing Skills"
(i.) "...collaborative blogging improved students’ attitudes toward writing. Feedback generated from the collaboration, rather than the use of technology itself, increased students’ motivation to write."(Drexler, Dawson, Ferdig, 2007, p. 14) - you can read more about this by clicking here -










7 -
1. 200 Minutes of Writing about Great Expectations (Writer's Workshop)
  • (a.) Click on the book below to visit the assignment page.
great-expectations.jpg

Week 3 July 12 - 14, Writing in Grades 7 - Graduate School
Due Date: 7/22/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 7 rubrics for this week.
For this week, you will use two new software applications: 1.) your Wikispace & 2.) Cmap Cloud.

12
1.) Start Building a Digital Classroom for Teaching

2.) Opportunity to Write
  • a. This past week, you and your classmates used the CROWD strategy to initiate a writing opportunity.
  • b. In this assignment, your task is to answer a classmates' questions on the VoiceThread called: What do students do when they are Analyzing Rhetorically?
  • c. Answer the questions written by the person I paired you up with (the CROWD questions are on slide #2)
Student Pairings
Hydrogen - Sodium
Helium - Phosphorus
Lithium - Silicon
Beryllium - Aluminum
Boron - Magnesium
Carbon - Neon
Nitrogen - Oxygen
Fluorine - Dr. Shively
  • d. HINT: -
    File Not Found
    File Not Found
    - to help you with the tech part of this assignment
  • e. I replied to Fluorine, so you can see how I answered the CROWD writing prompts.
  • f. Rubric - would you do this if I did not score your effort?.....Hmmmmm.....most of you would, but there are those who would not...so, the rubric has been shared with you and it is called CROWD 2

3.) Moving Math in the Write Direction: Reflect and Discuss

4.) Gradebook, Part 2
  • a. Continue on this trail of learning to learn about the value of keeping a gradebook for yourself

13
1.) Continue Building a Digital Classroom for Teaching
2.) Teaching Writing Strategies to Middle School Students with Disabilities
  • (i.) "One reason for the poor writing performance of students with disabilities is that they use an approach to writing that minimizes the role of planning (Graham & Harris, 1996; Thomas, Englert, & Gregg, 1987) (as cited in Monroe & Troia, 2006, p. 21) - you can read more about this by clicking here -

14
1.) 200 Minutes of Writing about Great Expectations (Writer's Workshop)
  • a. Click on the book below to visit the assignment page.
great-expectations.jpg

Week 4, July 19 - 21, Writing in Grades 7 - Graduate School
Due Date: 7/22/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 3 rubrics for this week.
19
1. DARE Essay
  • 1. Many of you, including myself, did not do step #3 from this wikipage yet http://theliteracywiki.wikispaces.com/DARE%2C+SPACE%2C+CDO+and+SEARCH
    • a. Complete an essay
    • b. Put the essay in your week 3 folder (if you give me a word document - I promise you, it will not get read)
    • c. tell me your essay is ready to share with another student
    • d. proceed to step #2
  • 2. Provide Feedback to a classmate
    • a. I have shared a folder with you called DARE Essays. This folder includes your essays and a directions document (called directions)
    • b. Use the directions document and a rubric called DARE Essay Feedback to provide feedback to your classmate
    • c. proceed to step #3
  • 3. Use the feedback
    • a. Use all of the feedback provided by your classmate
    • b. I will assess your essay using Appendix A of the Teaching Writing Strategies to Middle School Students with Disabilities and give you a score on your essay (this counts as a grade)

2. Why Should You, Your Students or Students in the United States Write to Learn?
  • a. In order to support YOUR strategic learning network, you will be given the opportunity to learn with multiple means of expression (Rose & Meyer, 2002), you will:
    • (i.) Read a presentation about the importance of Writing to Learn
    • (ii.)
      Cursor_and_Cmap_Cloud_-_Cmaps.jpg
      Figure 1: Organization of Cmap Cloud Writing Folder
      Construct a concept map of the ideas in the presentation
      • (1.) Sign In to Cmap Cloud
      • (2.) Select Cmaps
      • (3.) Open the Writing folder
      • (4.) Open your folder
      • (5.) Choose New Cmap
      • (6.) Build your Cmap
    • (iii.) Save the concept map to the folder I created for you in the Writing Folder
    • (iv.) Write a paragraph using the concept map
  • b. In order to support YOUR strategic learning network, you will be provided with relevant and timely feedback (Rose et al., 2002) using a rubric called Write to Learn
  • c. You can accomplish these goals - by clicking here -

3. Use a concept map to write about symbolism in Great Expectations
  • a. Concept Maps help organize and structure knowledge because they serve as a scaffold to help human memory because:
    • (i.) human memory is not a single “vessel” to be filled, but rather a complex set of interrelated memory systems
    • (ii.) the most critical memory systems for incorporating knowledge into long-term memory are the short-term and 'working memory'
    • (iii.) all incoming information is organized and processed in working memory by interaction with knowledge in long-term memory
    • (iv.) working memory can process only a relatively small number of psychological units (five to nine) at any one moment
    • (v.) relationships among two or three concepts are about the limit of working memory’s processing capacity
    • (vi.) to structure large bodies of knowledge requires an orderly sequence of iterations between working memory and long-term memory as new knowledge is being received and processed
    • (vii.) diverse sources of research [state] that our brain works to organize knowledge in hierarchical frameworks and that learning approaches that facilitate this process significantly enhance the learning capability of all learners

  • b.I placed a concept map in a folder with your name on it INSIDE of the Writing folder in the Cmap Cloud (see Figure 1 to the right)
    • (i.) This folder contains a concept map called Symbolism in Great Expectations
    • (ii.) Study the concept map and pay close attention to how I described Joe
    • (iii.) Explain how Dickens used another character to symbolize an action or feeling by completing the concept map template
    • (iv.) Write a 3 paragraph essay that:
      • (1.) Introduces the idea of symbolism
      • (2.) Describes how Dickens used Joe to symbolize weakness [2]
      • (3.) Describes how Dickens used a character of your choice to symbolize something
      • (4.) Write your short essay on a Google Doc and place it in the Week 4 folder that you created or WILL CREATE!
    • (v.) Use a rubric called Symbolism in Great Expectations to evaluate your work



Screen Shot 2016-07-05 at 16.05.33.png
20 & 21 (yes, I am giving you a single task[3] for two days)
1. Improving the Writing Performance of High School Students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Writing Difficulties**
  • (a.) "This study examined the effectiveness of persuasive writing instruction using the Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) model with high school students identified with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)." (Jacobson & Reid, 2012, p. 218) - you can learn about this by clicking here -










Section 3

  • Syllabus


  • (the wikipage is the syllabus)

  • References

  • Adoniou, M. (2013). Drawing to support writing development in English language learners. Language and Education, 27(3), 261–277.

  • Bruun, F., Diaz, J. M., & Dykes, V. J. (2015). The Language of Mathematics. Teaching Children Mathematics, 21(9), 530.

  • Coyne, M. D., McCoach, B. D., & Kapp, S. (2007). Vocabulary Intervention for Kindergarten Students: Comparing Extended Instruction to Embedded Instruction and Incidental Exposure. Learning Disability Quarterly, 30(2), 74 – 88.

  • Drexler, W., Dawson, K., & Ferdig, R. E. (2007). Collaborative blogging as a means to develop elementary expository writing skills. Electronic Journal for the Integration of Technology in Education, 6, 140–160.

  • Edmister, E., Staples, A., Huber, B., & Garrett, J. W. (2013). Creating Writing Opportunities for Young Children. Young Exceptional Children, 16(3), 24–35.

  • Hermann, R. S., & Miranda, R. J. (2013). From cars to creatures: converting analogies into student-centered activities. The Science Teacher, 80(7), 51.

  • Horn, M. (2005). Listening to Nysia: Storytelling as a Way into Writing in Kindergarten. Language Arts [H.W. Wilson - EDUC], 83(1), 33.

  • Monroe, B. W., & Troia, G. A. (2006). Teaching Writing Strategies to Middle School Students with Disabilities. The Journal of Educational Research, 100(1), 21–33.

  • Morgan, D. N. (2012). Teaching Writers through a Unit of Study Approach. Voices from the Middle, 19(3), 32.

  1. ^ if you do not see it, you did not complete an earlier assignment properly or skipped it.
  2. ^ if you disagree with me, that is ok, just make a new map
  3. ^

    **


    kinda ;-)