• "In our study, however, we found no support for the claims made in Put Reading First and translated into the No Child Left Behind Act. Our findings show that the children in the commercial phonics-based programs are not significantly better than children in literature-based programs in phonics use, in or out of textual content" (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altwerger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005, p. 69).

Overview

This is the EDU 612 course home page and it is divided into 4 sections. On this wikipage, you will find: 1.) course information; 2.) the topics of the course, links to lessons and embedded assignments; and the 3.) the course syllabus

Section 1


Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 4.16.56 PM.png

Section 2 - Topical Calendar

January 26, 2016 - May 12, 2016
January | February | March | April | May

Crest Logo Stacked_K.jpg



birchbarkhouse.jpgJanuary

Week 1

Due Date: 1/31/2016 by 23:59:59

1/26/2016,

  • 1. Promote, support, and model creative and innovative thinking and inventiveness by organizing information with a concept map.
    • a. Example of a concept map?
    • b. Why use a concept map?
    • c. Practice creating a concept map on paper from my notes from the article Success with ELLs by DelliCarpini (2011)
      • (i.) Link to my notes
        • (A.) concepts from my notes: strategic reading, effective readers, reading strategies, explicit instruction, self-efficacy, beliefs, struggling readers, metacognition, Anticipation Guide, Directed Reading-Thinking Activity, Vocabulary Self-Selection, Gist
    • d. Use a rubric to guide your thinking about this task
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found




February

Week 2, Setup Your Digital Learning Environments

Due Date: 2/7/2016 by 23:59:59
There is 1 rubric for this week.

2/2/2016



Week 3, Strategically Read with an Anticipation Guide

Due Date: 2/14/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 3 rubrics for this week.
2/9/2016
  • 1. Please join the literacy wiki so you can add your thoughts to the wiki. You can do this by - clicking here -

  • 2. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
    • a. You will spend the next 9 weeks developing an understanding of the history of reading instruction by conducting a genetic analysis of reading instruction. You will use writing to improve reading comprehension strategies throughout this learning experience to help you understand what you are reading. We will read:
      • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
      • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
      • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction (Palardy, 1997)
      • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
      • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
      • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
      • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
      • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005)
      • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

    • b Find out what a genetic analysis is by - clicking here -.

    • c. Use an Anticipation Guide to read The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
      • 1. Find out what an Anticipation Guide is by - clicking here -
      • 2. Complete the Anticipation Guide below about The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
        • (i.) Anticipation Guide: (click here to see the Anticipation Guide in a new tab)
        • (ii.) Complete the Anticipation Guide on paper and place it in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

    • d. Read The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think - by clicking here - (rubric is on this wikipage)

  • 3. Create an Anticipation Guide for Chapters 1 - 2 of the Birchbark House
    • a. Review a concept map about Anticipation Guide by - clicking here -
    • b. Identify the Common Core ELA Anchor Standard(s), if any, that require(s) students to invoke their prior knowledge prior to reading a text. - Click here for the Anchor Standards -
    • c. Identify the Common Core ELA Anchor Standard(s), if any, that require(s) students to invoke their prior knowledge prior to reading a text. - Click here for the Common Core Standards -
    • d. Read Chapter 1 of the Birchbark House and develop an Anticipation Guide for this chapter
    • e. Read Chapter 2 of the Birchbark House and develop an Anticipation Guide for this chapter
    • f. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • 1. rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • 2. place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

  • 4. Discuss the Birchbark House
    • a. Use the Read, Respond, Revisit & Discuss Writing to Improve Comprehension Strategy to
      • (i.) Read a concept map about this strategy - by clicking here -
      • (ii.) We will use this strategy to discuss each chapter throughout the rest of the semester
      • (iii.) Use the strategy - on this wikipage - (rubric is on this wikipage)

Week 4 - No Class



Week 5

Due Date: 2/28/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 3 rubrics for this week.

2/23/2016

  • 1. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
    • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
    • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990) (rubric is on this wikipage)
    • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction (Palardy, 1997)
    • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
    • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
    • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
    • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
    • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005)
    • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

  • 2. Use the Read, Respond, Revisit & Discuss Writing to Improve Comprehension Strategy while reading Chapters 3 & 4 of the Birchbark House


  • 4. Build a Unit Plan using the Birchbark House
    • a. Visit your wikispace (- click here - if you forgot where your wikispace is)
    • b. Create a New Wikipage in Your Wikispace
      • (i.) Name the wikipage: The Birchbark House Unit Plan
      • (ii.) On the wikipage, just type in a bunch of junky letters as placeholders - you will do more with this wikipage next week.


March

Week 6

Due Date: 3/6/2016 by 23:59:59

3/1/2016

There are 2 rubrics for this week.
1. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Use VoiceThread to Converse
    • a.
    • b. Let's discuss Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
    • c. - Click here - to Login to Voicethread and Discuss a few ideas related to Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)

2. Build a Unit Plan using the Birchbark House
  • a. Visit your wikispace (- click here - if you forgot where your wikispace is)
  • b. Open the Wikipage called The Birchbark House Unit Plan
    • (i.) Visit - this wikipage - and copy this Understanding by Design Unit Plan into the body of The Birchbark House Unit Plan
    • (ii.) Save the wikipage

3. Write Like an Author by Analyzing Rhetorically

4. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House
    • a. - Click Here - to begin discussing how to develop literacy with the the Birchbark House

5. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
  • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
  • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
  • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction (Palardy, 1997) (rubric is on this wikipage)
  • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
  • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
  • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
  • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
  • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005)
  • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)


Week 7

Due Date: 3/13/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 5 rubrics for this week.

3/8/2016

A. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Use VoiceThread to Converse
    • a. -
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
      - to see your VoiceThread password
    • b. Let's discuss Another look at literature-based instruction (Palardy, 1997)
    • c. - Click here - to Login to Voicethread and discuss a few ideas
    • d. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you have shared with me

Anchor standards.png
Figure 1
B. Build a Unit Plan using the Birchbark House
  • 1. Visit your wikispace (- click here - if you forgot where your wikispace is)
  • 2. Open the Wikipage called The Birchbark House Unit Plan and click on the Edit button
    • (a.) Add Unit Goals using Common Core Standards, please follow this procedure
      • (i.) Visit the Corestandards.org web site by - clicking here -
      • (ii.) Click on the link to the Anchor Standards (see Figure 1)
      • (iii.) Add goals to the unit plan wikipage from College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for: 1.) Reading, 2.) Writing, 3.) Speaking and Listening & 4.) Language
  • (3.) Use a rubric to guide your work
    • (a.) rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • (b.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

C. Write Like an Author by Analyzing Rhetorically

D. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House
Note: We are going to be working on writing skeletal lesson plans for this book for the remainder of the semester.
There will not be a rubric for this assignment so that you can feel relaxed when completing it.
  • 1. Open your wikispace in a new tab, view your Birchbark House unit plan and click the Edit button
  • 2. Re-read your reading goal
  • 3. Visit CoreStandards.org
    • a. Click on the Reading: Literature link below the Anchor Standards link (see Figure 1 to the right)
    • b. Choose Grade 5
    • c. Read through all the student actions (e.g. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.) and choose one to work with this for this week
    • d. Copy that student action and put it under the Understandings Section of your unit plan
    • e. Save your wikispace by using the Save and Continue Feature[1]
    • f. Scroll down to the Learning Activities section and copy this template into your wikipage. See my example - by clicking here -
      • Lesson #1:
      • Goal:
      • Objective:
      • Learning Task:
      • Instructional Tasks:
      • Assessment:
    • g. Complete the lesson template

E. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
  • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
  • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
  • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction]] (Palardy, 1997)
  • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998) (rubric is on this wikipage)
  • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
  • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
  • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
  • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005)
  • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

F. Self Assessment
  • 1. Please fill in your student gradebook based on the rubrics I have scored.
    • a. your student gradebook must be filled in with scores I have given you, not scores you have given yourself
    • b. Use a rubric to guide your work
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you have shared with me

G. The Birchbark House
  1. Please make sure you have read up to pg. 99 by next week

Week 8

Due Date: 3/27/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 5 rubrics for this week.

3/15/2016

A. Self Assessment
1. Please fill in your student gradebook based on the rubrics I have scored.
  • a. your student gradebook must be filled in with scores I have given you, not scores you have given yourself
  • b. Please complete the 2nd entry from the Self-Assesment Rubric, if you don't know how, continue to the next step. If you know how, please skip to step B
    • (1). If you did not download the desktop version of Dropbox, you skimmed the Base Camp - so please do that now -by clicking here -
    • (2.) Once it is downloaded and you have logged in, just open a rubric from there, complete it and then save it.

B. The Birchbark House
  • 1. Please finish the book by the next class, which is after spring break.

C. Write Like an Author by Analyzing Rhetorically

D. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Use VoiceThread to Converse
    • a. -
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
      - to see your VoiceThread password
    • b. Let's discuss Chapter Five, Fishtail Pipe from the Birchbark House using VoiceThread
    • c. - Click here - to Login to Voicethread and follow these student actions[2] :
      • (1.) pose a literal comprehension question to your classmates from Chapter Five
        • (i.) "Literal comprehension refers to an understanding of the straightforward meaning of the text, such as facts, vocabulary, dates, times, and locations. Questions of literal comprehension can be answered directly and explicitly from the text" (Day & Park, 2005, p.62)
        • (ii.) write your question using a Wh word. "Questions beginning with where, what, when, who, ..., and why are commonly called wh- questions." (p. 66)
      • (2.) respond to my question about Fishtail by replying to my comment on the voicethread (My icon is the cactus)
      • (3.) elaborate on the remarks of others (you will do this in the next class)
    • d. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you have shared with me

E. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
  • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
  • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
  • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction]] (Palardy, 1997)
  • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
  • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999) (rubric is on this wikipage)
  • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
  • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
  • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005)
  • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

F. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House

Week 9

3/22/2016

NO CLASS: SPRING BREAK

Week 10

Due Date: 4/3/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 4 rubrics for this week.

3/29/2016

A. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Use VoiceThread to Converse
    • a. -
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
      - to see your VoiceThread password
    • b. Let's discuss Chapter Six, "Pinch" from the Birchbark House using VoiceThread
    • c. - Click here - to Login to Voicethread and follow these student actions[2] :
      • (1.) pose an inferential question to your classmates from Chapter Six
        • (i.) "Making inferences involves more than a literal understanding. Students may initially have a difficult time answering inference questions because the answers are based on material that is in the text but not explicitly stated. An inference involves students combining their literal understanding of the text with their own knowledge and intuitions." (Day & Park, 2005, p.63)
        • (ii.) Use this - web page - from DePaul University to help you write an inferential question
      • (2.) respond to my question about Pinch by replying to my comment on the voicethread (My icon is the cactus)
      • (3.) elaborate on the remarks of a classmate on the character trait VoiceThread page
        • (i.) Look for my cactus icon on the character trait VoiceThread page
        • (ii.) Under my cactus, several students replied to me correctly, please find BSCStudent_1's literal question
        • (iii.) Answer her question by replying to her - do not add a new comment that is not a direct reply. If you do, I will not count it.
    • d. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you have shared with me

B. Write Like an Author by Analyzing Rhetorically
  • 1. Post #5: Use a literacy technique called a story within a story to write like Louise Erdrich. (rubric is in your dropbox folder)

C. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House
  • 1. Open your wikispace in a new tab, view your Birchbark House unit plan and click the Edit button


  • 2. Re-read your reading goal
  • 3. Visit CoreStandards.org
    • a. Click on the Reading: Literature link below the Anchor Standards link (see Figure 1 to the right)
    • b. Choose Grade 5
    • c. Read through all the student actions and choose one to work with this for this week
    • d. Copy that student action and put it under the Understandings Section of your unit plan
    • e. Save your wikispace by using the Save and Continue Feature[1]
    • f. Scroll down to the Learning Activities section and copy this template into your wikipage. See my example - by clicking here -
      • Lesson #3:
      • Goal:
      • Objective:
      • Learning Task:
      • Instructional Tasks:
      • Assessment:
    • g. Complete the lesson template

    • h. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
    • (1.) rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • (2.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

D. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
  • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
  • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
  • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction]] (Palardy, 1997)
  • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
  • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
  • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
  • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
  • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005)
  • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

E. Self Assessment
1. Please fill in your student gradebook based on the rubrics I have scored.
  • a. your student gradebook must be filled in with scores I have given you, not scores you have given yourself
  • b. Please complete the 3rd entry from the Self-Assesment Rubric



April

Week 11

Due Date: 4/10/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 4 rubrics for this week.
A. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Use VoiceThread to Converse
    • a. -
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
      - to see your VoiceThread password
    • b. Let's discuss Chapter Seven, "The Move" from the Birchbark House using VoiceThread
    • c. - Click here - to Login to Voicethread and follow these student actions[2] :
      • (1.) pose an evaluative question to your classmates from Chapter Seven
        • (i.) "... requires the learner to give a global or comprehensive judgment about some aspect of the text. ...In order to answer this type of question, students must use both a literal understanding of the text and their knowledge of the text's topic and related issues" (Day & Park, 2005, p.64)
      • (2.) respond to my question about Nokomis by replying to my comment on the voicethread (My icon is the cactus)
      • (3.) elaborate on the remarks of a classmate on the Ojibwe Girl VoiceThread page
        • (i.) Look for the LARGE ICON that looks like this:Screen Shot 2016-04-10 at 2.23.12 PM.png
        • (ii.) Answer her question by replying to her
    • d. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you have shared with me

B. Write Like an Author by Analyzing Rhetorically
  • 1. Post #6: Use a literacy technique called foreshadowing to write like Louise Erdrich. (rubric is in your dropbox folder)

C. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House
  • 1. Open your wikispace in a new tab, view your Birchbark House unit plan and click the Edit button


  • 2. Re-read your reading goal
  • 3. Visit CoreStandards.org
    • a. Click on the Reading: Literature link below the Anchor Standards link (see Figure 1 to the right)
    • b. Choose Grade 5
    • c. Read through all the student actions and choose one to work with this for this week
    • d. Copy that student action and put it under the Understandings Section of your unit plan
    • e. Save your wikispace by using the Save and Continue Feature[1]
    • f. Scroll down to the Learning Activities section and copy this template into your wikipage. See my example - by clicking here -
      • Lesson #4:
      • Goal:
      • Objective:
      • Learning Task:
      • Instructional Tasks:
      • Assessment:
    • g. Complete the lesson template

    • h. Use a rubric to guide your thinking
    • (1.) rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • (2.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

D. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
  • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
  • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
  • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction]] (Palardy, 1997)
  • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
  • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
  • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
  • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
  • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005
  • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

E. Self Assessment
1. Please fill in your student gradebook based on the rubrics I have scored.
  • a. your student gradebook must be filled in with scores I have given you, not scores you have given yourself
  • b. Please complete the 4th entry from the Self-Assesment Rubric

Week 12

Due Date: 4/17/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 4 rubrics for this week.

4/12/2016

A. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Screen Shot 2016-04-12 at 2.14.36 PM.pngUse VoiceThread to **Explain how a series of scenes fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story.
    • a. Let's discuss Chapters 8 & 9, "First Snow" & "The Blue Ferns" from the Birchbark House using VoiceThread
    • b. - Click here - to Login to Voicethread and follow the directions
    • c. use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder named Week 12

B. Write Like an Author by Analyzing Rhetorically
  • 1. Consider the following points about planning from: "Children's high-level writing skills: Development of planning and revising and their contribution to writing quality" (Limpo, Alves, & Fidalgo, 2014)[3]
    • a. "There is strong evidence that planning instruction is a way to promote students’ writing performance" (p. 179)
    • b. Harris, Graham, and Mason (2006) demonstrated that children as young as 7 years of age can beneficiate from interventions targeting planning skills.
  • 2. Write on a wikipage on my literacy wikispace
  • 3. Please use the 200 mInutes of writing rubric in your Dropbox for this assignment

C. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House
  • 1. Open your wikispace in a new tab, view your Birchbark House unit plan and click the Edit button


  • 3. Vocabulary Lesson
    • a. Scroll down to the Learning Activities section and copy this template into your wikipage.
      • Lesson #5

      • Goal: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

      • Objective: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

      • Learning Task:

      • Instructional Tasks:

      • Assessment:

    • b. Complete the lesson template with your ideas for a learning & instructional tasks and an assessment, but....examine our example from class first - by clicking here -

    • c. Use a rubric to guide your thinking (NOTE: This rubric has changed to guide you toward improved lesson plans)
    • (1.) rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • (2.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

D. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?

E. Self Assessment
1. Please fill in your student gradebook based on the rubrics I have scored.
  • a. your student gradebook must be filled in with scores I have given you, not scores you have given yourself
  • b. Please complete the 5th entry from the Self-Assessment Rubric (rubric is in your dropbox folder)

Week 13

Due Date: 4/24/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 4 rubrics for this week.

4/19/2016

A. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Screen Shot 2016-04-12 at 2.14.36 PM.pngUse VoiceThread to Compare and contrast two or more characters in a story drawing on specific details in the text.
    • a. Let's discuss Chapter 10, "The Visitor" from the Birchbark House using VoiceThread
      • (i.) Take out a piece of paper and divide it into 1/3s
      • (ii.) Reread p. 144-145
      • (iii.) In 1/3 of the paper, describe what Nokomis did.
      • (iv.) Reread p. 148-149
      • (v.) On another 1/3 of the paper, describe what Omakayas did.
      • (vi.) Reread 150 - 151
      • (vii.) On the last 1/3, describe what Old Tallow did
    • b. - Click here - to Login to Voicethread and follow the directions
    • c. use a rubric to guide your thinking
      • (i.) rubric:
        File Not Found
        File Not Found
      • (ii.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder named Week 13

B. Write Like an Author by Analyzing Rhetorically
  • 1. Consider the following points about planning from: "Children's high-level writing skills: Development of planning and revising and their contribution to writing quality" (Limpo, Alves, & Fidalgo, 2014)[4]
    • a. "There is strong evidence that planning instruction is a way to promote students’ writing performance" (p. 179)
    • b. Harris, Graham, and Mason (2006) demonstrated that children as young as 7 years of age can beneficiate from interventions targeting planning skills.
  • 2. Write on a wikipage on my literacy wikispace
  • 3. Please use the 200 mInutes of writing rubric in your Dropbox for this assignment

C. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House
  • 1. Open your wikispace in a new tab, view your Birchbark House unit plan and click the Edit button


  • 3. Vocabulary Lesson Part II
    • a. Scroll down to the Learning Activities section and copy this template into your wikipage.
      • Lesson #6

      • Goal: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

      • Objective: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

      • Context for Reading: Students will read p. ? - ? in chapter 10 in small groups

      • Learning Task: Students will create a word map based on the article: "A Word Map for Middle School- A Tool for Effective Vocabulary Instruction" (Rosenbaum, 2001)

      • Instructional Tasks:

      • Assessment:

    • b. Complete the lesson template with your ideas for a learning & instructional tasks and an assessment, but....examine our example from class first - by clicking here -

    • c. Use a rubric to guide your thinking (NOTE: This rubric has changed to guide you toward improved lesson plans)
    • (1.) rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • (2.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

D. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
  • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
  • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
  • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction]] (Palardy, 1997)
  • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
  • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
  • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
  • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
  • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005
  • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

E. Self Assessment
1. Please fill in your student gradebook based on the rubrics I have scored.
  • a. your student gradebook must be filled in with scores I have given you, not scores you have given yourself
  • b. Please complete the 6th entry from the Self-Assessment Rubric (rubric is in your dropbox folder)

Week 14

Due Date: 5/1/2016 by 23:59:59
There are 3 rubrics for this week.

4/26/2016

A. Participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing your own clearly and persuasively.
  • 1. Use the Read, Respond, Revisit and Discuss Strategy with the article: Spelling: From Invention to Strategies (Miller, 2002)
    • a. Retrieve the article - from your Dropbox - and read it.
  • 2. Login to VoiceThread and respond to my responses

  • 3. Use a rubric to guide your responses
    • a. rubric:
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • b. place the rubric in the week 14 folder

B. Developing Literacy with the Birchbark House
  • 1. Open your wikispace in a new tab, view your Birchbark House unit plan and click the Edit button


  • 2. Spelling Lesson Part I
    • a. Scroll down to the Learning Activities section and copy this template into your wikipage.
      • Lesson #7

      • Goal: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

      • Objective: Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences.

      • Learning Task: Students will create a word sort or word hunt, based on the article: "Effective Spelling Instruction in the Middle Grades: It's a Lot More than Memorization" (Templeton, 2002)

      • Instructional Tasks:

      • Assessment:

    • b. Complete the lesson template with your ideas for a learning & instructional tasks and an assessment, but....examine our example from class first - by clicking here -

    • c. Use a rubric to guide your thinking (NOTE: This rubric has changed to guide you toward improved lesson plans)
    • (1.) rubric
      File Not Found
      File Not Found
    • (2.) place the completed rubric in the Dropbox folder you shared with me

D. What have literacy educators and researchers thought about reading instruction for the past 4 decades?
  • 1. The Purpose of Basals: What Children Think (Cairney, 1988)
  • 2. Let's move toward literature-based reading instruction (Fuhler, 1990)
  • 3. Another look at literature-based instruction]] (Palardy, 1997)
  • 4. Balanced instruction: Insights and considerations (Freppon & Dahl, 1998)
  • 5. Whole language works: Sixty years of research (Daniels, Zemelman, & Bizar, 1999)
  • 6. Research-based reading instruction: Myths about the National Reading Panel report (Shanahan, 2003)
  • 7. The reading wars (Pearson, 2004)
  • 8. Reclaiming literacy instruction: Evidence in support of literature-based programs (Arya, Martens, Wilson, Altweger, Jin, Laster & Lang, 2005
  • 9. If I Follow the Teachers' Editions, Isn't That Enough? Analyzing Reading Volume in Six Core Reading Programs (Brenner & Hiebert, 2010)

E. Self Assessment
1. Please fill in your student gradebook based on the rubrics I have scored.
  • a. your student gradebook must be filled in with scores I have given you, not scores you have given yourself
  • b. Please complete the 7th entry from the Self-Assessment Rubric (rubric is in your dropbox folder)


May

Week 15


Screen Shot 2016-04-26 at 14.05.24.png
Merry Christmas in May - No Class!!!

5/3/2016



    • Section 3

    • Syllabus - this wikipage is the syllabus

    • Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

    • Collaborate and Communicate
      • 1. Collaborate effectively with colleagues, parents, school leaders, and other professionals (e.g., agency personnel, OT, PT, speech pathologist, social workers, etc.).
      • 2. Advocate for students and families to secure needed services and promote social justice.

    • Assess
      • 3. Compose, select and adapt quizzes, tests, and other methods for assessing learning.
      • 4. Select and use specific methods for assessing student learning before during and after instruction to check student understanding.

    • Instruct
      • 5. Use grade level standards, learning progressions, IEP goals and benchmarks, and student learning history to identify short and long term goals.
      • 6. Design a sequence of lessons towards a specific learning outcome around a core topic.
      • 7. Adapt curriculum tasks and materials for specific learning goals; choosing, adapting tasks, text and materials for specific learning goal.
      • 8. Make content, skills, and concepts explicit through modeling, think aloud, guided practice and examples.
      • 9. Use strategies to promote active student engagement in whole class and small group instruction.
      • 10. Scaffold instruction during lessons
      • 11. Teach students to work independently
      • 12. Select, implement and evaluate instructional and assistive technologies to support student learning
      • 13. Identify and implement an instructional strategy or intervention in response to common patterns of student performance or individual need
      • 14. Analyze one’s teaching for the purposes of improving one’s instruction.

    • Manage the Learning Environment (Classroom Management)
      • 15. Establish and implement effective classroom and individual student management plans to increase student social and academic outcomes.
      • 16. Creating an engaging and positive learning environment to improve student outcomes
      • 17. Provide high rates of behavior specific feedback to improve student outcomes

    • Course Description
      • As part of Buffalo State’s elementary education requirements, this six-credit course is designed to provide an integrated, holistic experience that will better prepare pre-service teachers for the complex task of educating children. This experience is intended to be one phase of a path toward professional growth and development. This course integrates university assignments and hours of classroom field experience in Professional Development Schools. For all junior participants, each day at the PDS Site may consist of observing, planning teaching, reflecting, learning and sharing.

    • Evaluation Procedure
      • This course is based on a percentage of the total number of points you accumulate. Your grade is not determined on a 100-point scale. It is very common for the course point total to be over 100 points. Please do not try to calculate your grade based on a 100-point scale.
      • 95% - 100% -->A
      • 90% - 94% -->A-
      • 87% - 89% -->B+
      • 84% - 86% -->B
      • 80% - 83% -->B-
      • 77% - 79% -->C+
      • 74% - 76% -->C
      • 70% - 73% -->C-
      • 67% - 69% -->D+
      • 64% - 66% -->D
      • LESS THAN 64% -->E

    • Attendance
      • 1. Attendance is required in the college classroom.
      • 2. Assignments will be posted online are due on the same date as if you were in class.

    • Assignments
      • 1. All must be handed in by the deadline posted on the wiki
      • 2. Work will not count if handed in 1 week past the deadline - if you have a problem and can't do the work, talk to me and we will work something out
      • 3. Revisions to assignments must be completed no later than 1 week after I score your rubric

    • Academic Dishonesty Policy
      • Candidates who engage in plagiarism, cheating on examinations, submit the same work as other candidates, unauthorized collaboration, falsification and/or any other violation of academic integrity will receive an “E” grade in the course. Buffalo State has a campus wide license to Turnitin for unlimited submissions of student papers for plagiarism detection.
      • The Academic Misconduct Policy is posted online at www.buffalostate.edu/studentaffairs/x522.xml. Buffalo State official procedures for academic misconduct are online at: www.buffalostate.edu/academicaffairs/x607.xml. An official explanation of what constitutes plagiarism and student resources may be found at: http://www.buffalostate.edu/professionaldevelopment/x702.xml. 



    • Students with Disabilities
    • Any student who requires accommodations to complete the requirements and expectations of this course because of a disability is invited to make his or her needs known to the instructor and to the director of the Disabilities Services Office, 120 South Wing, 878-4500.‖
    • (See www.buffalostate.edu/offices/disabilityservices/fac-syllabus.htm)

    • Incomplete Grades
      • I do not give incomplete grades. I urge students to make note of the dates for dropping a course without penalty. If students find they are not able to work at the level required for this course for whatever reason, students may drop the course without penalty up to a certain point in the semester. Know that point and know your limitations and my expectations. In any case, students should contact me if there are potential difficulties. My contact information is located on the first page of the syllabus so please contact me as needed – I am here to help you.

    • Expectations for Behavior and Procedures for Disruptive Individuals
      • All candidates are expected to comport themselves in a manner that does not convey to others in the college community any disrespect, intolerance or rude behavior based upon age, race, religion, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or status – either marital, veteran or socioeconomic. All members of the college community are expected to contribute to the college environment and to move the college community toward respect for all.
    • OR

      • Procedures Regarding Disruptive Individuals: Disruptive behavior by students in my class will not be tolerated. Whenever I deem a student to be acting in a disruptive or threatening manner, I will exercise my right to ask that individual to leave the classroom. If refused, I will exercise my right to notify University Police. The responding officer will determine whether an arrest should be made or whether a referral to medical or counseling staff is appropriate. If a student is perceived as a danger to himself, herself, or others, the dean of students may propose an interim suspension until a hearing is held. Any student removed from class will have the right to a hearing.
    • (see www.buffalostate.edu/offices/stuaffr/academicpolicies/codeofrights.html)
    • Note: Cell phones and must be turned off upon entering the classroom or laboratory. You will be asked to withdraw from the class if disruption occurs more than one (1) time.

Class Wikispaces
Teacher Name's
Classroom Wikispace
Ali

Ben

Brianna

Kaitlyn

Lindsay B.

Lindsay N.

Matthew

Nicole

Samantha

Tiffany

Whitney
http://alivance.wikispaces.com/

http://benjaminfazioswiki.wikispaces.com/

https://bsnyder18.wikispaces.com

http://kaitlynrichert.wikispaces.com/

http://lindsayjbarry.wikispaces.com/

http://lindsayneadow.wikispaces.com/

https://matthewseufert01.wikispaces.com

http://nicolehahn.wikispaces.com/

https://sammariekuhn.wikispaces.com

https://kwiatkowskit.wikispaces.com/

https://whitneytracy.wikispaces.com

  1. ^ Notice the black triangle to the right of the Save button. When you click on that triangle you will see a Save and Continue option.
  2. ^ CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.C Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
  3. ^ All points are from p. 178 - 179 and were cited studies
  4. ^ All points are from p. 178 - 179 and were cited studies